Saturday, July 31, 2004

Beyond Windows

BBC NEWS | Technology | Microsoft looks beyond Windows

Friday, July 30, 2004

Give Stick

I've mentioned this before, but re-iterate! . . IMHO,  following July 29 discussions with Sam Moorhead: it is upon the often elusive "web-stickiness" factor that we should perhaps concentrate? . . [Always bearing in mind our individual time/distance/and tech-change-awareness limitations.]

Saturday, July 24, 2004

Web Forum Romanum

Forum Romanum: Who we are. Introducing a new website which is setting out to re-publish classical texts in an accessible digital library.

First Wine

First Wine? Archaeologist Traces Drink to Stone Age: "The whole process is sort of magical,' said Patrick McGovern, an expert on the origins of ancient wine and a leader in the emerging field of biomolecular archaeology. 'You could even call [fermentation] the first biotechnology,' said McGovern, who is based at Philadelphia's University of Pennsylvania. . . .

from National Geographic News

Wednesday, July 21, 2004

Conference at UCL

Managing Information News:

Electronic Imaging, the Visual Arts and Beyond... is a cross-sectoral, multi-disciplinary, global conference for people interested in new technologies in the cultural sector running from 26-30 July 2004 (at UCL Institute of Archaeology, London)

Museums, Libraries and Archives Council's Marcus Weisen (Disability Development Officer) and David Dawson (Senior ICT Adviser) are speaking at the Thursday Workshop.

For full information about the week's events, and especially the first session, Making Cultural Websites Accessible visit - > this details page.

Monday, July 19, 2004

500k text .gif ?

Serge Thibodeau quoted in Business Week magazine :

"Loren's article is appropriately called You've Got Rank, and depicts some of the problems that many small businesses faced back in November, and then January of this year, after Google implemented major changes to their search algorithm. I think you will like it.
If you are running a slower Internet connection using a phone modem, it might take you up to a minute to download the article, since we had to put it in a .gif file/graphic, and that file is over 500 k in size. We did it that way in order to render the format of the article as natural as we could make it."

[pw notes: - neither I, nor any other graphic designer I'm aware of, has ever dreamt of publishing so much text in .gif format . . . and "got away with it" so nicely! Re Serge's last sentence above, we'd have wanted it in .pdf, or some other way guaranteeing legibility- wouldn't we.]



Sunday, July 18, 2004

Cerevisia Recipe

Re Euronews feature, July 18, 2004:

"The Ancient Pyramids may never reveal their hidden secrets but now Japanese scientists using pictures on the tomb walls have revealed the truth about Egyptian beer brewing."
Bryn Walters, ARA Director, is presently preparing a short introductory article mentioning the late Peter Reynolds experimental beer archaeology . . as a preamble to details* of the forthcoming world conference on this topic at the University of Barcelona (*the official invitation to ARA Members is to appear shortly on the ARA website).

BBC

BBC NEWS | Technology | Building a web fit for all

Picasa

Google's new Picasa will, hopefully, empower all ARA members and contributors - to enable a better flow of quality, web-adapted, images; as recommended on previous occasions re the website improvement policy.

Wednesday, July 14, 2004

Audrey Cruse

In Oxford last week our ARA Academician Martin Henig gave me a tip, inter alia, to read the very new Roman Medicine book by Audrey Cruse who is freshly qualified in archaeology from the Open University and also the University of Reading. She is a keen and accurate worker. Audrey Cruse looks at the many different aspects of medicine and health in the Roman Empire, especially Roman Britain: doctors, hospitals and temple medicine . . .the blue link above takes you to the History Bookshop . . . and their content-rich page suggests to me that it really is time to completely update the ARA books webpage?

Tuesday, July 13, 2004

Libitina's Cup

Thank you Libitina for always publishing worthwhile and astonishing items in your blog. I must improve my news gathering system . . especially when the source is from my doorstep? No need to reproduce that dazzling Roman "cup" photograph here - let's go back and see Libitina's blog again!

Statuesque

CAESAR'S wife statue made whole again
Guardian - UK
... When the young Evans left England in 1879 for a spot of travel, archaeology and freelance ... at what is now a village but was once the important Roman city of ...

HI-TECH Scots stand guard over herald of the gods
The Herald - Glasgow,Scotland,UK
... a Glasgow-based 3D laser-scanning bureau operating in the archaeology and heritage ... his work is mainly known through ancient descriptions and Roman marble copies ...

This as-it-happens News Alert is brought to you by Google News (BETA).
[using the new Alerts formatting (RTF?) - and I'm now also posting this to the ARA News page - pw]

Monday, July 12, 2004

Chipping Ongarum

From David Keys in The Independent: All roads lead to Chipping Ongar: dig points to a hidden Roman town.

An undiscovered Roman town may exist in south-west Essex, according to archaeological evidence being uncovered in London.
A large Roman road has been found heading out of London towards what is now the village of Chipping Ongar, 11 miles west of Chelmsford.
Archaeological evidence suggests Chipping Ongar was an important communications hub in Roman times and probably the site of a small town.
Excavations in Leyton in the London Borough of Waltham Forest have unearthed a Roman highway with a gravel surface about six metres wide. Roman wheel ruts have been found in the road surface. Two metre-wide drainage ditches run either side of the road.
The highway was probably built for military purposes, but would have also served small towns and large country estates. [continue]


Thanks Mirabilis for updating me on this. I must put it on the ARA Nunciationis page today. It reminds me of our ARA Member Keith Lawson's recent work on the Roman road heading South from Chichester; Noviomagus . . to an as yet unconfirmed destination.

Friday, July 09, 2004

Bryn Walters

Bryn Walters, Director of the ARA, has made an interesting public statement about Shillingstone Roman villa. It is published in this blog under the comments section via - > this link.
There is only one photo of Bryn on the ARA website (so far!) - > on this page re Tockenham. He is seen explaining a mysterious Roman "sacred well" to spellbound ARA members - at another site (beside the River Wye).

Royal Welsh

My favourite investigative tool, Google Alerts, surprised me this morning when I entered Royal Welsh Show (just up the Roman road from my place). It gave me an attractive new blog-like layout with an active link title at the top of each section.
When checking about Alerts updates I found - > this interesting page dated Feb. '04.

Thursday, July 08, 2004

Clipper

Bloglines started a new blog-clip service yesterday . . with excellent UI [user interface design]. Initially I think I'll experiment with "Clip" (functionality) as a super-fast side-blog for off-topic items as illustrated by Laughter today, July 8, - thank you to Laudator.

Wednesday, July 07, 2004

Colchis

Not Georgia USA . . _Georgia_ at edge of Roman Empire and EU now has an English language newspaper, The Messenger, carrying this - >marvellous Colchis account.

Alexei Solopov

Today is the EPNS holds the 2004 Annual General Meeting at the British Academy, London. Dr. Alexei Solopov, Fellow at All Souls College Oxford, is reading an interesting paper: Place-names in Roman Britain in their imperial context.
As a keen EPNS member I hope to have sight of Dr. Solopov's new account quite soon and, hopefully, his permission to convey an abstract of it to ARA members.
In the meantime here is a useful link: - > to the EPNS Membership Form.

Martin Henig

Just back from an inspiring week in Oxford, UK, . . where the weather was perfect for photography just as in the City of Oxford website picture. Dr. Martin Henig, at the Institute of Archaeology, provided me with many themes to follow up regarding the ARA's website production and progression. Martin is a dedicated, and much appreciated, Advisor to the Association for Roman Archaeology. Highlights from his list will be reported on shortly in this blog.
The short-course I attended was superb and links related to this will be added in "comments" below as soon as time allows.

Tuesday, July 06, 2004

Shillingstone Villa

Transcript, verbatim, of broadcast by BBC Radio on 30 June 2004.
Interviewed: STEVE WALLIS, SENIOR ARCHAEOLOGIST AT DORSET COUNTY COUNCIL

INTRO. A group North Dorset residents say they're concerned that an historic Roman villa and bath house will be lost forever.
The remains were discovered on site at Shillingstone bought by Wyatt Homes from Dorset County Council.
An archeological dig has the site, but it will now be filled in and built on because no-one can afford to buy back the area for restoration.
Joining us now is Steve Wallis - one of the Senior Archeologists from Dorset County Council.....

GOOD MORNING STEVE, . .

Q. AROUND TWO THOUSAND PEOPLE TURNED UP TO VIEW THE SITE AT THE WEEKEND SO IT MUST BE AN IMPRESSIVE SITE - WHY CAN'T ANY OF IT BE SAVED?
A. Nothing can be done to save it. Protecting it as a scheduled monument by English Heritage would be impossible due to cost. And the Council certainly cannot afford to buy back the land. We were pleased all the people turned up because it shows how many people are interested.

Q. SOME OF THE RESIDENTS SUGGEST A COMPROMISE OF JUST KEEPING PART OF IT AS PART OF THE ESTATE - I KNOW THAT IS A DECISION FOR THE DEVELOPERS - BUT IS IT A POSSIBILITY?
CAN YOU DESCRIBE THE SITE FOR US?
A. Nothing visible at ground level - lower walls and below ground structure of a Roman villa were discovered. Initial trial work we found it was clearly Roman. Then the area was stripped of top soil - which exposed bath house and villa.

Q. WERE YOU SURPRISED AT WHAT THE DIG UNEARTHED?
A. It was surprising that it covered more ground than we expected. We were just really pleased that we were given the extra time and money to complete the job that was required which was making a full record of the site and it's details.Very interesting site so managed to get more information than we would have done.

Q. IS IT A RARE SITE?
A. No these sites are not particularly rare - there are plenty of others for people to see. Fully recorded now and everything been done. This is not a conflict situation. Developers and Council have been very fair and given the amount of time required to finish the job. Plenty of others to see.

[pw notes: in June the Association for Roman Archaeology contributed 300 GBP to part-fund the rescue and effort to save this site. Bryn Walters, ARA Director, is making a statement which will shortly be published here and also on the ARA website.]

Thank you BBC Southampton for recording this interview and raising public and international awareness of this issue. See initial June blog report - > here.

Big Bridge

OK - not quite as big as Caesar's Rhine bridge but here is the new web report (summary) . . . of the first significant work on the Roman bridge linking England to Wales - > at Chepstow.